home design software, Mac OS X Home Design Software, Symbol Libraries
Mac OS X Home Design Software, Symbol Libraries
 
home design software, Mac OS X Home Design Software, Symbol Libraries
home design software, Mac OS X Home Design Software, Symbol Libraries
Mac OS X Home Design Software, Symbol Libraries

Colonial House Style -- A FREE MacDraft Floor Plan for the Mac!

American colonial architecture includes several building design styles associated with the colonial period of the United States, including First Period English, French Colonial, Spanish Colonial, Dutch, German Colonial and Georgian Colonial. These styles are associated with the houses, churches and government buildings of the period between about 1600 through 1850. This house is a good bad-weather house.

English Colonial buildings typically included medieval details including steep roofs, small windows , minimal ornamentation and a massive central chimney.

French Colonial houses were basic houses that featured double-pitched hipped roofs and were surrounded by porches to handle the hot summer climate.

Spanish Colonial dwellings in Spanish Florida were often the "board house", which can be visualized as a small one-room cottage constructed of pit-sawn softwood boards, typically with a thached roof.

Dutch Colonial houses were small, one room cottages with stone walls and steep roofs to allow a second floor loft. By 1670 or so, two-stepped gable-end homes were common in New Amsterdam. Later, in the countryside of the Hudson Valley, the Dutch farmhouse evolved into a linear-plan home with straight-edged gables moved to the end walls. Around 1720, the distinctive Gambrel roof was adopted from the English styles, with the addition of overhangs on the front and rear to protect the mud mortar used in the typically stone walls and foundations.

German Colonial houses were a "half-timber" style of construction which used a frame of braced timbers filled-in with masonry (brick or stone). However, the colonists modified the method to typically include a first floor of field stones, and a second floor and roof system of timbers or logs. Eventually, field stones became the building material of choice for the entire homes, as they grew from one-room cottages to larger farmhouses. The "bank house" was a popular form of home during this period, typically constructed into a hillside for protection during the cold winters and hot summers of the region. The two-story "country townhouse" was also common around Pennsylvania during this time.

Georgian Colonial houses had square, symmetrical shapes, central door, and straight lines of windows on the first and second floor. There is usually a decorative crown above the door and flattened columns to either side of it. The door leads to an entryway with stairway and hall aligned along the center of the house. All rooms branch off of these. Georgian buildings were ideally in brick, with wood trim, wooden columns and entablatures painted white. In the US, one found both brick buildings as well as those in wood with clapboards. They were usually painted white, though sometimes a pale yellow. This differentiated them from most other structures that were usually not painted. A Georgian Colonial-style house usually has a formally-defined living room, dining room and sometimes a family room. The bedrooms are typically on the second floor. They also have one or two chimneys, and sometimes these are very large.

The pictures below depict a kind of generalized Colonial plan.



Colonial House Style
An Unfurnished Colonial House




Colonial House Style
A Furnished Colonial House


Other house styles

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